Python代写-CS551K
时间:2021-02-06
CS551K — Multi-agent Systems
Argumentation
Overview
In this assessment, you will create an advanced framework for reasoning building on argumentation theory.
Learning Outcomes
This assessment has the following learning outcomes.
1. Understand the theory behind abstract argumentation
2. Be able to implement efficient abstract argumentation solvers
3. Be able to perform non-monotonic reasoning with a knowledge base and preferences
4. Demonstrate the ability to implement components of a multi-agent system
Overall Contribution
This assessment will count for 20% of the overall mark for the module.
Hand-in
This assessment is due at 23:59:59 on the 2nd of Feb 2020. Handing in up to 24 hours late will attract a
10% penalty, while handing in up to 7 calendar days late will attract a 25% penalty. Both penalties will be
deducted as a percentage of the mark obtained. Work handed in more than a week late will be treated as a
“no paper”.
Submission should take place via myAberdeen. Please upload a single .ZIP file containing your source
code. If you would like to include explanatory notes, please include a PDF titled README.PDF as part of
your zip file.
Please adhere to the formatting instructions, as all outputs will be automatically marked.
Marks will be deducted if output formats differ.
Plagiarism
Plagiarism is a serious offence, and will not be tolerated. If you are unsure about whether your work counts
as plagiarised, please contact the course coordinator before the submission deadline. For further details,
please refer to the Code of Practice on Student Discipline ( https://tinyurl.com/y92xgkq6).
Assessment Tasks
Abstract Argumentation
Download the file parser abstract.py and at the start of your program, add the import
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from parser_abstract import read_file
Calling read file(filename) where filename is a string will return a tuple consisting of a set of
arguments and a set of defeats (with the first argument assumed to defeat the second). You can, for
example, then read a file passed in from the command line using
import sys
from parser_abstract import read_file
af=read_file(sys.argv[1])
Task 1a
Given such an abstract argument framework, write a program that prints out all of an argument framework’s
stable extensions. Your program should be called task1a.py. I will call it by running the following command
python3 task1a.py file.aaf
Where file.aaf is the name of a file containing the abstract argumentation framework. Your program
should provide this output by using the command
print(stable)
Where stable is a python list of lists, each representing a single stable extension, and sorted alphabetically.
In other words, given the stable extensions {{b, a, c, f}, {d, a}, your output should be
[[’a’, ’b’, ’c’, ’f’], [’a’, ’d’]]
You can achieve this by simply calling print on your list of lists.
You can expect that inputs to this program will not exceed 20 arguments.
Task 1b
Create a program called task1b.py, which I will call by running the command
python3 task1b.py file.aaf
This program should output a list of arguments (sorted alphabetically) representing the grounded exten-
sion. In other words, given the grounded extension {b, a, c, f} your output should be
[’a’, ’b’, ’c’, ’f’]
You can expect that inputs to this program will range from 10 to 100000 arguments, and your program
should take no more than 10 seconds to run.
Structured Argumentation
For this task, you should use the file parser.py which depends on rule.py and atom.py. The file
argument.py might also be useful. Feel free to modify these files as required for this assessment, you
will definitely need to add some extra methods to some of the files. The files tandem.gr and undercut.gr
contain example inputs file.
Task 2a
Given a structured argumentation framework as input, your task here is to print out the number of strict
and defeasible arguments which can be generated. You should base your answer on the file task2a.py,
modifying it as needed.
Your program will be called as per the following example
python3 task2a.py tandem.gr
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Task 2b
Given a structured argumentation framework as input, your task here is to print out the number of attacks
(not defeats) generated. You should base your answer on the file task2b.py, modifying it as needed.
Your program will be called as per the following example
python3 task2b.py tandem.gr
Task 2c
Given a structured argumentation framework as input, together with the preference principles and rebut
used, your task here is to print out the number of defeats generated. You should base your answer on the
file task2c.py, modifying it as needed.
Your program will be called as per the following example
python3 task2c.py tandem.gr wd true
Here, wd stands for the weakest link democratic principle, and true denotes restricted rebut. See inside the
task2c.py file for more details.
Task 2d
Given a structured argumentation framework as input, together with the preference principles and rebut
used as well as a semantics, your task is to print out the justified conclusions of the extensions. You should
base your answer on the file task2d.py, modifying it as needed. Note that this prints out every extension
ordered alphabetically and by length.
Your program will be called as per the following example
python3 task2d.py tandem.gr wd true preferred
Here, wd stands for the weakest link democratic principle, and true denotes restricted rebut. preferred
means that the preferred extensions should be generated. See inside the task2d.py file for more details.
Task 2e
Finally, your task here is to print out the number of extensions in which a specific argument is labelled in,
out, or undec. You should base your answer on the file task2e.py, modifying it as needed.
Your program will be called as per the following example
python3 task2e.py tandem.gr wd true preferred a
Here, wd stands for the weakest link democratic principle, and true denotes restricted rebut. preferred
means that the preferred extensions should be generated. a is the conclusion in question (you may assume
that it will always be a positive, i.e., non-negated literal). See inside the task2e.py file for more details, as
well as labelling.py if needed.
Marking Scheme
Task Marks Comments
Task 1a 40%
Task 1b 10% marks will be given based on the size of input successfully handled.
Task 2a 7.5% 2.5% will be taken off if contraposition isn’t handled correctly
Task 2b 7.5% 2.5% will be taken off if contraposition isn’t handled correctly
Task 2c 10% No marks will be allocated if contraposition isn’t handled correctly
Task 2d 10% No marks will be allocated if contraposition isn’t handled correctly
Task 2e 15% No marks will be allocated if contraposition isn’t handled correctly
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Marks will be deducted if submission instructions are not adhered to, or output isn’t displayed as required.
Changelog
24/01/2020 Initial version
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