Rstudio代写-ST340-Assignment 2
时间:2021-02-21
ST340 Programming for Data Science
Assignment 2
Released: Friday week 5, 2021-2-12; Deadline: 12:00 on Monday week 8, 2021-3-1.
Instructions
• Work in groups of at least one and at most three. Group work is preferred.
• Specify your student numbers and names on your assignment. You need submit only one copy for each
group.
• Answer the questions on paper with explanations for all the work you have done.
• Any programming should be in R. Your report should be created using R markdown. Submit two files:
a knitted pdf document and the corresponding R markdown file.
• This assignment is worth 17% of your overall mark.
Q1 Expectation Maximization
For the EM algorithm with the mixture of Bernoullis model, we need to maximize the function
f(µ1:K) = f(µ1, . . . ,µK) =
n∑
i=1
K∑
k=1
γik log p(xi|µk),
where for i ∈ {1, . . . , N} each xi ∈ {0, 1}p, for k ∈ {1, . . . ,K} each µk = (µk1, µk2, . . . , µkp) ∈ [0, 1]p, and
p(xi|µk) =
p∏
j=1
µ
xij
kj (1− µkj)1−xij .
(a) Show that the unique stationary point is obtained by choosing for each k ∈ {1, . . . ,K}
µk =
∑n
i=1 γikxi∑n
i=1 γik
.
(b) The newsgroups dataset contains binary occurrence data for 100 words across 16,242 postings. Postings
are tagged by their highest level domain; that is, into four broad topics comp.*, rec.*, sci.*, talk.*.
The dataset includes documents, a 16, 242 × 100 matrix whose (i, j)th entry is an indicator for the
presence of the jth word in the i post; newsgroups, a vector of length 16, 242 whose ith entry denotes
the true label for the ith post (i.e., to which of the four topics the ith post belongs); groupnames,
naming the four topics; and wordlist, listing the 100 words.
(i) Run the EM algorithm for the mixture of Bernoullis model on the newsgroups data with K = 4.
You should use some of the code from the EM Lab to help you. A run on the newsgroups dataset
could take over 10 minutes so it is recommended to test your code on a small synthetic dataset
first.
(ii) Comment on the clustering provided by your run of the algorithm. Can you measure its accuracy?
(iii) The output of the EM algorithm depends on the initial values of the parameters. Explore how
sensitive your output is with respect to these values.
1
Q2 Two-armed Bernoulli bandits
(Hints: Please note that since the output of any strategy will be necessarily random, you will need to repeat
the experiments multiple times to get a general idea about performance.)
(a) Implement both Thompson sampling and the -decreasing strategy in this setting with the unknown
success probabilities of the arms being 0.6 and 0.4.
(b) Describe the behaviour of -decreasing when the sequence (n)n≥1 is defined by n = min{1, Cn−1},
where C is some positive constant, and check whether it is consistent with your implementation.
(c) Describe the behaviour of -decreasing when the sequence (n)n≥1 is defined by n = min{1, Cn−2},
where C is some positive constant, and check whether it is consistent with your implementation.
(d) Compare and contrast the implementations of -decreasing and Thompson sampling for this problem.
Q3 k nearest neighbours
(a) Create a function to do kNN regression using a user-supplied distance function, i.e.
knn.regression.test <- function(k,train.X,train.Y,test.X,test.Y,distances) {
# YOUR CODE HERE
print(sum((test.Y-estimates)^2))
}
Predicted labels should use the inverse-distance weighting to each neighbour.
(b) Test your function on the following two toy datasets using distances.l1 from lab 6. Try different
values of k and report your results.
Toy dataset 1:
n <- 100
set.seed(2021)
train.X <- matrix(sort(rnorm(n)),n,1)
train.Y <- (train.X < -0.5) + train.X*(train.X>0)+rnorm(n,sd=0.03)
plot(train.X,train.Y)
test.X <- matrix(sort(rnorm(n)),n,1)
test.Y <- (test.X < -0.5) + test.X*(test.X>0)+rnorm(n,sd=0.03)
k <- 2
knn.regression.test(k,train.X,train.Y,test.X,test.Y,distances.l1)
Toy dataset 2:
set.seed(100)
train.X <- matrix(rnorm(200),100,2)
train.Y <- train.X[,1]
test.X <- matrix(rnorm(100),50,2)
test.Y <- test.X[,1]
k <- 3
knn.regression.test(k,train.X,train.Y,test.X,test.Y,distances.l1)
(c) Load the Iowa dataset (see ?lasso2::Iowa for details). Try to predict the yield in the years 1931, 1933,
. . . based on the data from 1930, 1932, . . .
install.packages("lasso2")
library("lasso2")
data(Iowa)
train.X=as.matrix(Iowa[seq(1,33,2),1:9])
train.Y=c(Iowa[seq(1,33,2),10])
2
test.X=as.matrix(Iowa[seq(2,32,2),1:9])
test.Y=c(Iowa[seq(2,32,2),10])
k <- 5
knn.regression.test(k,train.X,train.Y,test.X,test.Y,distances.l2)
(d) Try different values of k, and compare your results with ordinary least squares regression and ridge
regression.
3


essay、essay代写
essay、essay代写